Little towns

Corsica is full of delightful little towns, each with their own unique characters and quirks.

We spent a day floating about visiting them en-route to our next destination.

Here’s the hubby at Algajola. It has a 16th century fort on the seafront and a long sandy beach.

Algajola is small with its older buildings clustered around its 16th century castle. Next to this is a citadel built in the same stone with a protruding circular watch tower.

Next on the road trip is the beach at St Florent. The town itself is small with a maze of narrow streets and passages.

Plus there’s a lively waterfront with a row of restaurants.

Like many of the Corsican towns Saint Florent has a Genoise citadel, built in the 15th century. It’s a sturdy round monument that looks out across the gulf below.

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Calvi

Calvi’s town beach is a pretty stretch of sand backed by pine forests and a cute little beach side railway.

Whether it’s bathed in golden evening sunshine or in the bright glare of daylight, it attracts plenty of folk.

The beach stretches for 6km With a gently shelving gradient as well as warm and protected waters.

There’s lots of restaurants and cafĂ©s nearby – some of which serve directly onto the beach.

We enjoy some sun soaking before the next adventure 🙂

Mountain villages

We’re off to explore the hill villages of Corsica’s Haute-Balagne on this little road trip.

Tiny villages cling to the hillside along the winding roads that meander throughout the lush greens of the Corsican countryside.

Sant’Antonino is the oldest inhabited village on Corsica and the pastel hued houses cling together along the winding alleyways and back streets.

Buildings tumble down the slopes while you can discover colourful corners around every bend.