Wall art

If like me you’re reduced to a snap happy frenzy at the sight of some colourful wall art then you’ll be in seventh heaven in Singapore.

We stumbled across these spectacular examples in Little India and naturally I had to spend a while taking some snaps!

These joy filled images are Kathaka by Didier Mathieu aka Jaba – the name is a reference to a type of Indian dance.

You can find them at 68 Serangoon Road, at the junction with Upper Dickson Road

And just across the road is a mural by Eunice Lim called Book-a-Meeting for Artwalk Little India 2018 which is an extension of the 30-year old Siyamala bookstore it is connected to.

I enjoy the cheeky cow seemingly taking a look at the sombre hubby!!!

Sri Veeramakaliamman

Singapore is home to endless architectural and cultural delights and the area known as Little India is no exception.

We’re heading to one of the most historic, colourful temples in the area – Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple.

The temple, found onSerangoon Road is one of the oldest temples in Singapore.

The incredibly ornate entrance is known as a Rajagopuram – a tall pyramidal tower built at the main entrance to a Hindu temple.

Built by Indian pioneers who came to work and live here the temple was the first in the serangoon area and became a focus of early Indian Social Cultural activities there.

From the incredibly ornate facade to the colourful interior, the temple is a riot of celebration and human interactions.

One of Singapore’s oldest Hindu temples the Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple is dedicated to the goddess and destroyer of evil, Kali – or Sri Veeramakaliamman.

Outside in the courtyard, a cornucopia of deities can be found in inglenooks, around the roofline and in every conceivable colour.

Each figure represents a particular deity, that offers a different blessing to their devotees.

Incredibly the images above are actually statues not paintings – the level of detail is incredible.

Singapore sensory overload

I’m so far behind with my travel blog that I’m only just starting on the first trip of 2019!!

As it was a ‘big’ birthday year I got to chose where we headed for our long haul adventure – and it just had to be back to Vietnam. The place that set off my love affair with Asia way back in 2008.

We also decided to stop over in Singapore for a few days too. So let’s dive headfirst into these amazing places.

We stayed in the lovely Summer View hotel that was ideally placed to explore this hectic city.

There’s lots of fascinating districts in Singapore including Arab street and the colourful Little India district which is where I dragged the hubby first!

From multi-coloured shutter and incredible street art, to buildings so candy coloured that you want to nibble them, this area is amazing to just wander round and soak up the sights.

The incredible House of Tan Teng Niah is one such incredible rainbow hued sight.

The house was built in 1900 and belonged to Tan Teng Niah, a Chinese merchant who made sweets and sold them in stores along nearby Serangoon Road.

Gorgeous isn’t it! You can find this little gem by taking the MRT to Little India Station, taking exit E and following the snap happy tourists 🙂

Every wall and building is a colour clashing dream – even the toilet below is a pastel coloured delight!

Last looks

Our final day in Paris ends in style at the beautiful Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris.

Commonly known as Sacré-Cœur Basilica and often simply Sacré-Cœur.

The basilica was designed by Paul Abadie. Construction began in 1875 and was completed in 1914. The basilica was consecrated after the end of World War I in 1919

From the magnificence of the pearly basilica domes to the more earthy delights of the capital streets.

From thoughts on the prevalence of social media to the creative urge, the paste-ups cover a whole range of topics!

The final trip of our first ever visit to Paris ends in a slightly more morbid setting . . .

The Montparnasse Cemetery in the 14th arrondissement of Paris is the second largest operating cemetery of the French capital.

The 45 acre landscaped funeral park is like an open-air museum as many graves have been listed as Historic Monuments.

It is the final resting place of many famous, world renowned artists. These include Serge Gainsbourg, Samuel Beckett, Jean Paul Satre and Simone De Beauvoir – the only ones we managed to find!