The Louvre pyramid

The Louvre is the world’s largest art museum and also the most visited.

It contains more than 380,000 objects and displays 35,000 works of art and averages 15,000 visitors per day.

The most instantly recognisable part for many people is the pyramid, a controversial addition made in 1989.

The large pyramid serves as the main entrance to the Louvre Museum and it has become a landmark of the city of Paris.

It’s a large glass and metal pyramid designed by Chinese-American architect I. M. Pei that is surrounded by three smaller pyramids.

The pyramid and the underground lobby beneath it were created because of problems with the Louvre’s original main entrance, which could no longer handle the enormous number of visitors on an everyday basis.

Even though it is now one of Paris’s key tourist attractions, the pyramid’s original design inspired a lot of heated debate.

Many people were unhappy with the modern design sitting slap bang in the middle of the classic French Renaissance style of the original museum.

Other concerns included the pyramid being an unsuitable symbol of death from ancient Egypt.

But thankfully all the concerns were put aside and we are now left with the iconic structure for all to enjoy.

Galeries Lafayette Xmas

Galeries Lafayette is one of the most popular, chic and distinguished shopping centres in Paris. 

You can browse this temple to consumerism under a stunning 100 year-old steel and glass Coupole.

The Galeries Lafayette offers its visitors a splendid glass Coupole, rising to a height of 43 meters, which can be seen from across the city.

This majestic Art Nouveau steel and glass Coupole became the iconic symbol of the mall

And when is the biggest, best time for shopping? Christmas of course and this mecca to all things shiny does not disappoint.

Galeries Lafayette has a suspended Christmas tree every year, the first of which was hung from the dome in 1976. It’s a gorgeous spectacle to behold!

The department store has been open since 1912 . The architect Georges Chedanne to head up the first major renovations which were completed in 1907.

Ferdinand Chanut, Georges Chedanne’s apprentice, designed the store’s stunning 43-meter high Neo Byzantine dome.

In 1932, the store was renovated with an Art Déco style by an architect named Pierre Patou.

It’s well worth a tour around to just soak in the glorious, shiny magnificence of its xmas spectacle.

Pieces of Paris

Just a few snaps from around the streets of Paris as we head towards the Pompidou Centre.

Street art plays a huge part in the street scene of the French capital as do numerous cafes and bars.

The Pompidou Centre was opened in 1977 and caused a bit of a stir at the time due to its ‘inside-out’ design.

It was the first building in architectural history to be done this way with its structural system, mechanical systems, and circulation exposed on the exterior of the building.

Initially, all of the functional structural elements of the building were colour-coded: green pipes are plumbing, blue ducts are for climate control, electrical wires are encased in yellow, and circulation elements and devices for safety (e.g., fire extinguishers) are red.

Below the husband is either contemplating the complex architecture or he’s hungry . . . .

Sauntering around the Seine

There’s plenty to see just wandering around the alleyways and markets on the banks of the Seine.

Including this sumptuous flower market that I dragged the reluctant hubby around.

Here he is looking particularly unimpressed with the delights on show!

The riverbanks are lined with little stalls full of curios, postcards and paintings.

Below posters advertise a Paris / Tokyo expo – reminding me of my favourite every country!

Parisians love their dogs (even if they do not like cleaning up after them!)

The walls and fences are impromptu outdoor galleries as fly posters vie to get their colourful creations in prime spots.

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Notre Dame

Last year we were lucky enough to visit the iconic Notre Dame cathedral before it was gutted by fire in 2019.

Notre Dame – meaning Our Lady of Paris – is a medieval Catholic Cathedral on the Île de la Cité in the 4th arrondissement of Paris.

It is considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture.

The fire that engulfed this noble in April 2019 was a tragedy both in terms of lost history and lost architecture.

On 15 April 2019 the cathedral caught fire, destroying the spire and the oak frame and lead roof,

The cathedral’s construction was begun in 1160 under Bishop Maurice de Sully and was largely complete by 1260, though it was modified frequently in the following centuries.

In the 1790s, Notre-Dame suffered desecration during the French Revolution; much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed.

The cathedral is famous for its beautiful stained glass and ornate rose windows.

Below is the North rose window including lower 18 vertical windows and another jewel bright window showcasing the amazingly detailed glass.

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Random Parisian streets

Some random street shots from our roams around Paris’s streets and parks.

Above is The ‘Fontaine des quatre parties du Monde one of the many ornate fountains in the city.

Le Bateau Ivre” (“The Drunken Boat”) is a 100-line verse-poem written in 1871 by Arthur Rimbaud. This is part of The Wall of Poems project that begun in 1992 in Leiden by the Dutch foundation Tegen Beeld.

It’s written on a wall near Saint Sulpice in Paris as Rimbaud is supposed to have written the poem in a nearby cafe.

Above is one of the many iconic Metropolitan metro signs. While below are a selection of shots from the Latin Quarter.

More colourful artwork adorns the back streets of the Latin Quarter.

As well as wall art there’s lots of street stalls selling everything from Old Master postcards and pulp fiction.

Lots of the stalls are situated alongside the banks of the River Seine. Stall holders simply unlock them in the morning and start trading.

Sparkly Tower

After messing about by the river for a while we’re ready to check out Paris by night!

The Eiffel Tower gets event prettier by night – it sparkles!!!!

Every evening, the Eiffel Tower sparkles for five minutes every hour on the hour, while a beaming shaft of light emits from the top.

It is also lit by more than 300 spotlights arranged along its girders giving the tower a gold sheen as soon as night falls.

20,000 bulbs twinkle and light up the tower in a spectacular choreography every hour.

The installation was designed to commemorate the new year in 2000 but has since been made permanent.

In June 2007 the 336 light bulbs were replaced with duplicates.

There is also a beacon from the top of the tower that sends out two light beams with a reach of 80 kilometres.

Pretty huh? Apparently however taking pictures of the Eiffel Tower at night is technically illegal as the light show is still under copyright to the original artist.

But as long as you’re not selling the images to make money then you’re ok . . I think!

Arc De Triomphe

We’re ticking off the landmarks at a rate of knots on a wet and windy Parisian day.

Next up is the majestic Arc De Triomphe – after the Eiffel Tower it is one of the most iconic of all the Paris sights.

It stands at the western end of the Champs-Élysées at the centre of Place Charles de Gaulle, (formerly named Place de l’Étoile( — the étoile or “star” of the juncture is formed by its 12 radiating avenues.

The Arc de Triomphe was started in 15 August 1806 and inaugurated in 1836 by French king, Louis-Philippe, who dedicated it to the armies of the Revolution and the Empire.

The Unknown Soldier was buried at the base of the arch in 1921.

The torch was designed by architect Henri Favier and is a circular bronze shield at the centre has a cannon muzzle which radiates a frieze of swords.

On 11 November 1923, surrounded by a multitude of former soldiers, the flame was lit for the first time. Since that moment, the flame has never been extinguished.

A daily ritual pays tribute to the Great Dead and each evening, at 6.30pm the flame is rekindled.

Landmark tower

It might be a grey day but it’s our first look at the iconic Parisian landmark that is the Eiffel Tower!

The original plan to build a tower 300 metres high was developed as part of preparations for the World’s Fair of 1889.

The idea was to “study the possibility of erecting an iron tower on the Champ-de-Mars with a square base, 125 metres across and 300 metres tall”.

It was Gustave Eiffel, an entrepreneur, Maurice Koechlin and Emile Nouguier, both engineers, and Stephen Sauvestre, an architect, whose plans were accepted.

Theirs was one of 107 projects put forward so this iconic landmark could have looked very different.

The construction work began in January 1887 and was finished on March 31, 1889. Only taking just over two years to complete.

Lots more to come from this lovely landmark.

Gay Paris!

Hot on the heels of our Corsican adventure we’re heading back to France again. This time to the romantic, enduring capital city of Paris!

First time on the Eurostar from St Pancras station. Highly recommended! Fast, comfy, cheap and easy.

We were on the earliest train possible – 5.40am! Cheapest fare and gets us there by mid day.

Less than three and a half hours later we’ve arrived at the Gare Du Nord! Ready to take on Paris!!