Heading for the summit

Here’s a few more snaps from the orange frenzy that is Kyoto’s Fushimi Inari Taisha shrine.

The shrine sits at the base of a mountain also named Inari which is 233 metres above sea level.

Fushimi Inari is the most important of several thousands of shrines dedicated to Inari, the Shinto god of rice.

Foxes (kitsune), are regarded as Inari’s messengers and can often be found with things in their mouths such as keys (for the rice granary).

The trails climb up the mountain to many smaller shrines which span four kilometers and takes approximately 2 hours to walk up.

We take a brief respite at Yotsutsuji intersection which is roughly half way up the mountain. It offers awesome views and cold drinks before the next section of the climb.

Although the cool little local doesn’t seem too friendly to me!

Below we can spot some more statues of Kitsune dotted between the endless Tori gates.

There are thought to be around 10,000 Tori gates in total and each one bears the name of the business or individual who donated it.

Each gate has been donated by a company or organisation giving thanks for their prosperity and in hope of good fortune in the future.

Finally we’ve made it to the top! I am very proud although the man mutters something about it only being a ‘little’ mountain . .  I care not, I climbed a mountain!!

Definitely take the time to visit this intriguing shrine if you’re visiting Kyoto.

It’s completely different to any others that we visited, both in scale and in visual impact. It’s an orangey delight!

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Fushimi Inari Taisha

Next up on our Kyoto sight seeing hitlist is Fushimi Inari Taisha.

This incredible shrine is like nothing we’ve ever seen before and very different from the usual Japanese shrines.

Fushimi Inari Taisha (伏見稲荷大社) is the head shrine of Inari, located in Fushimi-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

The shrine sits at the base of a mountain also named Inari which is 233 metres above sea level, and includes trails up the mountain to many smaller shrines which span four kilometers and takes approximately 2 hours to walk up.

It is a dream like corridor of seemingly endless orange Tori gates that wind their way up the mountain.

In some places the gates are so close together that the light barely penetrates through.

Since early Japan, Inari was seen as the patron of business, and merchants and manufacturers have traditionally worshipped Inari. Each of the torii at Fushimi Inari Taisha is donated by a Japanese business.

At the start of the hike the temple is jammed full of eager visitors but the higher and higher you climb, the sparser the crowds become!

I’ll post a few more snaps of this jazzy orange delight, so watch this space!!