The Charles Bridge, Prague

Men dressed as giant condoms and the gaggles of hen parties aside, Prague has some truly amazing sights to see.

One of the most iconic sights is the Charles Bridge.

The impressive bridge spans 621 metres across the Vltava river.

It is almost 10 metres wide while 30 statues, 16 arches and three bridge towers add to the impact of this formidable piece of history.

Artists, craftspeople and caricaturists set up shop along its length during the day.

 Views of one of the bridge towers

Construction started in 1357  and finished in the beginning of the 15th century.

Designed by Peter Parler the bridge replaced the former Judith Bridge that had been badly damaged by a flood.

Half way across the bridge a flight of steps leads down to give you access to Kampa Island. When we were there stalls, music and roasting meat gave it a Bavarian air.

If you look closely you can see the hundreds of padlocks on the railings left by couples to symbolise their ever lasting love. (Ahhhhhh)

There is a modern art museum situated on the island, but sadly, due to the recent flooding, it was closed for refurbishment.

Peering into the courtyard we could see the brightly coloured exhibits strewn across the floor and jumbled together, a testament to the power of the water.

The disturbing giant babies by David Cerny at Kampa Modern art museum. 

One of the bridges most often photographed attractions are the 30 statues ranged along its length. Most sculptures were erected between 1683 and 1714. They depict various saints venerated at the time.

Here’s photographs of just a few of them.

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