Corte

Heading onwards through the winding mountain roads of Corsica we’re heading for the heart of this enchanting island.

Our destination is the curious town of Corte. Once the capital of Corsica during the reign of Pasquale Paoli.

Corte is set in geographical centre of the island and was but governed by Pascal Paoli, the father of the Corsican independence movement, after he stormed the Citadel in 1755. Hence it is still known as the spiritual capital of the island.

Enchanting coloured shops and restaurants line the winding streets of Corte as you head to the central attraction – the citadel, imposing set on a rocky outcrop with a commanding view of the whole town.

The citadel’s oldest portion – the château known as the Nid d’Aigle, meaning ‘Eagle’s Nest’ – was built at the highest point in 1419.

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Calvi citadel

Perched atop a rocky headland, Calvi’s imposing Citadel oversees the bustling little town.

The massive citadel was fortified by Corsica’s Genoese rulers from the 12th century onwards.

While there is little in the way of businesses within it’s walls, it is still worth while exploring the alleyways and nooks and crannies.

Especially as there’s some amazing paper paste ups to be found!

There are stunning views to be had from the ramparts, both over the town and out to the sea.

The citadel also houses a former military hospital as well as containing the remains of a house that is rumoured to be the place where Christopher Columbus was born.

Colourful Calvi

Calvi is an attractive tourist town that is worth basing yourself in for its proximity to many pretty beaches.

A medieval citadel overlooks the marina from the bay’s western end, and is home to the Baroque St-Jean-Baptiste Cathedral and cobbled streets.

We’ll be exploring the meandering streets of the citadel later on.